Children consumerism essay

Goebig refers to her journey as "a slow move towards minimalism" – inspired by social-media duo The Minimalists, whose podcasts she recommends. These two Americans, Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, first experienced "a lingering discontent" with consumerism in their early 30s. As they explain on their website, "We had achieved everything that was supposed to make us happy." But they weren't. "Working 70-80 hours a week just to buy more stuff didn't fill the void: it only brought more debt, stress, anxiety, fear, loneliness, guilt, overwhelm and depression." 


If we don’t need to buy so much, we don’t need to work so much. We can take part-time jobs or reduce our working day from 8 hours to 6 hours. Some people are leaving very well-paid jobs to live a healthier life in the countryside or a more exciting life abroad. This is called ‘downshifting’. Parents can spend more time with their children and the unemployed are given more opportunities to work.

If we start to respect saving the earth more than spending money, we will become ‘conservers’. When we are conservers, we try to choose environmentally friendly products which are durable and last a long time. We may find growing our own vegetables or making our own clothes more rewarding than buying them.

What was the best thing you bought last week?

Could you choose from lots of different types? We like having a choice of what to buy. People who buy things are called consumers. Consumers have choices. We usually choose the colour, taste, smell or size of what we buy, but there are other choices we can make. The following questions will help you to consider these choices.

Where was it made?

If you don’t like the place it was made, you might decide not to buy that particular product. A lot of people don’t buy products from certain countries when they don’t like the way the country is run. Was it made in a factory or on a local farm? If the product was unbelievably cheap, the people who made it might not have been paid much.

Who made it?

Do you know? If a friend made it, you would probably like it more and you would want to keep it for a long time. If it was made by somebody who enjoyed making it, the quality and the design are probably better. Or does it look like it might have been assembled in a large factory?

There are children in Asia who make Santa Claus dolls for European children to play with. The children who make the toys don’t celebrate Christmas because they are not Christian; they think of the dolls as work. Would it be better if the children in Europe made their own Christmas dolls?

What is it made from?

One of the places where we want to buy expensive luxuries is at the airport’s duty-free shop. Next to the chocolate and cigarettes, there are beautifully shaped bottles and compact boxes full of perfumes and creams which promise to make you look and feel more beautiful. If you look at the ingredients you will find that the perfumes are mainly alcohol and the creams are mainly made of petroleum!

Almost all products are sold in packaging. Some products have too much packaging, creating more rubbish and using up resources. Some use recycled packaging, which is better for the environment.

Next time you go shopping, think about what you really need to buy. Don’t deprive yourself of things you like, but decide what you should buy before you go out, so that you won’t be influenced by advertisements or promotions. If it is more expensive to buy goods which don’t have much packaging and things which are more durable, buy less. If you can choose to work less, decide which things you would like to make, do or grow yourself. Even though you have less money, your life will become richer!

After traveling with 3 small children for a few months, we returned to our giant 7 bedroom home filled with things we didn’t need for 4 months and especially didn’t miss. We sold and gave away everything apart from the most useful and loved items and moved across the world to cleanse ourselves of consumerism. We now live in a 2 bedroom apartment and live life to the fullest. we have more time for us, ‘more time for others and more time to travel. Our kids are wanting less and are happy and content. your writing has changed our life. Thank you

The nationwide loss of manufacturing jobs leads to a corresponding growth in unemployment and the number of welfare recipients, less personal wealth, a shrinking tax base, fewer public services, and greater public and private debt, hopelessness for job seekers and a growing negative balance of trade. Americans can't really afford to buy the house next door but guess who has lots of dollars to spend here because of the money that we're exporting to buy their cheap junk?

Children consumerism essay

children consumerism essay

The nationwide loss of manufacturing jobs leads to a corresponding growth in unemployment and the number of welfare recipients, less personal wealth, a shrinking tax base, fewer public services, and greater public and private debt, hopelessness for job seekers and a growing negative balance of trade. Americans can't really afford to buy the house next door but guess who has lots of dollars to spend here because of the money that we're exporting to buy their cheap junk?

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