Essay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingway

Soon after the assault on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, and thus authorized the Secretary of Defense to determine the military zones, on which “all citizens can be relocated”. Although the military order was not aimed on any particular group of people, it caused the mass migration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent, both US citizens and people without US citizenship. In March 1942, Lt. Gen. John L. DeWitt, the commander of the Western Air Command of the US Army officially announced the urgent establishment of the special exclusion zone located along the west coast of the country and put in claims that all citizens of Japanese ancestry must check into special civilian centers. Hundreds of hundreds of Japanese were compelled to close their businesses, leave houses and farms, and move to remote internment camps, which also were called relocation centers. Many Japanese have returned home, some moved to other states in the US that were not included in the restricted area, and some of Japanese young men have even enlisted to serve in the US Army. But most just surrendered to their position as exiles. In January 1944, the US Supreme Court has dissolved the detention of citizens for no reason. The order was voided, and Asian-Americans began to depart from the camps, gradually returning to their former life. The last camp was closed in 1946, and by the end of the 20th century, the US government has paid about billion dollars to Japanese people affected by these migrations and to their descendants.

Essay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingway

essay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingway

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essay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingwayessay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingwayessay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingwayessay on a farewell to arms by ernest hemingway